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September Music Blog

September Music Blog

Improvising over a two five chord progression

Dean Cutinelli here from the Colorado School of Music. Remember we are just a call away to start your private music lessons. We offer guitar lessons, ukulele lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons, violin lessons, vocal lessons as well orchestral instruments. Now on to our discussion on improvising over a two five chord progression. (ii V)

Today I will be discussing different sounds that you can improvise over a minor two chord followed by a major or dominant five chord from the same key. These to chords are related and from the same key which keeps our options fairly limited, but still with great effectiveness. To keep things simple here we will take a D minor chord for a measure and followed by a G7 chord for a measure. (/dmin/G7/) At first glance we can see that these two chords are from the same key of C major. Real quick here is the way your chords appear diatonic to a major key. (I ii iii IV V vi vii’) So this chord progression is said to be a two five in the key of C major. 

Now you want to record yourself playing a simple rhythm with our two chords D minor and G7 in a two bar phrase. First try playing your C major scale as this is the tonic of these two chords. The sound is nice and also my be called a D dorian sound. This is saying the same thing two different ways. C Major is equal to D dorian. If you’r not familiar with the modes and Dorian mode please see my 2019 March music blog, as it’s dedicated to the Dorian mode. After you have a feel for the C Major scale let’s try playing a D minor pentatonic scale including the b5! Very cool rockin roll sound working the fret board now.  This scale works for a few reasons. First our foundation is a D minor chord. This sets up the D minor pentatonic scale nicely and the G7 chord compliments the sound. If we do the math behind the sound  you’ll see that the notes from a D minor pentatonic scale are D, F, G, A, C. The notes from the key of C major are C, D, E, F, G, A, B,. IF you compare the two scales all the notes are common or found in both scales. There are no conflicting notes. When running the D minor pentatonic scale in it natural order creates this great sound to jam on!

Well after reading this you should have a few different sound options when it’s time to improvise over ii V7 chords. Please feel free to contact us and come in for a music lesson to learn all about improvising and anything else pertaining to music from one of our great instructor at the Colorado School of Music in Golden Colorado. We offer guitar lessons, ukulele lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons, violin lessons and vocal lessons as wells as orchestral instruments. 

Thanks for reading!

music lessons
music lessons

Dean Cutinelli

CSoM NEWSLETTER … September 2019

CSoM NEWSLETTER … September 2019

The Colorado School of Music offers piano lessonsguitar lessonsukulele lessons, violin lessons, drums lessons, voice lessons and band/orchestra lessons for all ages and levels. Located in the heart of downtown Golden, our current roster is comprised of musicians from all over the Denver Metro area and includes students from Golden, Denver, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Littleton and Boulder! 

Please Leave a Message-

During the course of a week we field many phone calls from students and parents regarding lessons, scheduling and cancellations. During the afternoon, we often let the answering machine retrieve our messages so as not to disrupt class sessions. Please know that we are very conscientious about retrieving our missed calls and we always listen to our messages. We do not, however, make return calls for lesson cancellations unless requested. If you need to cancel for the week, please call 303-526-9865 and leave a message. Thank you! 

Never Too Old…music lessons for adults!

Music lessons are for the young at heart, not just the young. If you’ve been thinking of renewing your piano lessons or taking your guitar playing to the next level, try a private lesson with us! At the Colorado School of Music we are proud to have many adult students on our roster, studying all different disciplines. Our instructors are experienced with students of all ages, and will be happy to work with you to be sure that your lessons meet your individual needs. 

Adult music lessons are available for all instruments, including guitar lessons, piano lessons, drums, violin, and more.

Too Young For Music?

We often receive questions from parents regarding the appropriate/best age to start young children in formal music lessons. Of course, all children are different and there are always exceptions, but here are the general guidelines we use:

First, consider the instrument in relation to the age of the student. Piano lessons and Violin lessons are great choices for young children, as both violin and piano lessons have excellent curriculum for young beginners. Piano, in particular, provides a general overview of music theory and makes it easy to pick up other instruments as the student gets older. Some instruments can be difficult for beginners and aren’t as good for young children based on size, complexity, etc..       

Four years old is generally too young for formal lessons. Progress is very slow and it can be difficult to maintain the focus required for practicing. Four year old hands are also often too small.

We feel that six years old is generally the best age for young children to begin formal lessons. Many lesson books and methods are geared toward this age for beginners, and the progress made at this age is both faster than younger students and better learned, as lessons and concepts seem to ‘stick.’

Five year olds are in the middle – at this age, it seems to depend on the child. If motivated and interested, the progress with a five year old will be a bit slower, but nonetheless valuable. We’re always willing to try lessons with five year olds – please ask if you have more questions about beginners or you’d like to take an introductory lesson with your young musician. Parents/Guardians are welcome in all lessons!      

Need to Move?

Did your soccer coach just re-structure practice times and throw your schedule into chaos? You’re probably not alone.  We understand the rigors of fall scheduling…so if you find that your music lesson time slot doesn’t fit, call us at 303-526-9865 and leave your name, current time slot and any days and times that work for your schedule and we’ll do our best to re-locate you!

music lessons
Colorado School of Music

See you next month!

CSoM NEWSLETTER … August 2019

CSoM NEWSLETTER … August 2019

The Colorado School of Music offers piano lessons, guitar lessons, ukulele lessons, violin lessons, drums lessons, voice lessons and band/orchestra lessons for all ages and levels. Located in the heart of downtown Golden, our current roster is comprised of musicians from all over the Denver Metro area and includes students from Golden, Denver, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Littleton and Boulder! 

Back to…School Band and Choir!    

Are you part of a school choir, band or orchestra this fall? Earn that solo or make the push for first chair by sharpening your skills with private lessons! The Colorado School of Music offers private instruction for singing and all band and orchestra instruments including violin and viola, brass instruments, woodwinds and drum lessons. Call 303-526-9865 to book your lesson time!

Fall Schedules

If you’re a student returning from summer vacation and you’d like to get back into private music lessons for the fall – call 303-526-9865 or send an email to info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com  soon to reserve your day, time and instructor for August and the upcoming school year! Spots are going fast!  Our fall hours will be the same as our summer hours; M-F 2pm-8pm. We currently offer piano lessons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, voice lessons, drum lessons and lessons in all band instruments!

Need to Move?

Did your soccer coach just re-structure practice times and throw your piano schedule into chaos? You’re probably not alone.  We understand the rigors of fall scheduling…so if you find that your music lesson time slot doesn’t fit, call us at 303-526-9865 and leave your name, current time slot and any days and times that work for your schedule and we’ll do our best to re-locate you!

Please Leave a Message-

During the course of a week we field many phone calls from students and parents regarding lessons, scheduling and cancellations. During the afternoon, we often let the answering machine retrieve our messages so as not to disrupt class sessions. Please know that we are very conscientious about retrieving our missed calls and we always listen to our messages. We do not, however, make return calls for lesson cancellations unless requested. If you need to cancel for the week, please call 303-526-9865 and leave a message. Thank you!

Scheduled Holiday Closures, 2019

Labor Day- Monday, September 2nd

Thanksgiving Holiday, Thursday and Friday, November 28-29

Holiday Break- Monday, Dec. 23 2019 – Friday Jan. 3, 2020

Vocal lessons and Piano lessons

Practice practice, practice! See you in September!

August Music Blog

Improvising over the dominant 7th chord

Dean Cutinelli here from the Colorado School of Music. Remember we are just a call away to start your private music lessons. We offer guitar lessons, ukulele lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons,violin lessons, vocal lessons as well orchestral instruments. Now on to our discussion on improvising over dominant 7th chords.

The dominant 7th chord is one of the most unique chords you will find. The dominant chord appears on the fifth scale degree of the major scale. The chord is defined as a root, major 3rd, perfect 5th and minor 7th intervals. Yes it has a major 3rd and a minor 7th interval. This make the dominant 7th chord a lot of fun to improvise over. Another thing to remember is when you are trying to analyze the key of a certain progression, is that the dominant chord is always the five chord of some key. This works great when you have a chord progression or song that stays diatonic to a key. If we have a chord progression that goes from the two chord to the five chord and then the one, this example would be great to try your C major scale. (Dmin G7 Cmaj7). The fact that each of these chords are made up from the same c major scale enables you to play your c major scale over the whole progression. Of course your relative minor scale will work just fine as well. Remember they are relative keys because C major and A minor have the same notes in there scale as well as the same chords. You just have a different starting point for each scale or key.

Now I would like to break down the different scales or I like to refer to them as sounds. We will use a G7 chord for our example today. As I talked about earlier the C major scale is a great place to start your improvising. Another way of saying your going to play the notes from the C major scale is playing G mixolydian. All a G mixolydian scale is are the notes from C major just starting on G. This scale would play  G, A, B, C, D, E, and F. When starting on G and working up the notes listed you are now playing G mixolydian. If you compare G mixolydain to G major you will see the mixolydian scale has a minor 7th interval in it and not a major 7th interval. The mixolydian mode fits the dominant chord like a glove. Now try playing your major and minor pentatonic scale starting on the chord root. Now try those two pentatonic scales with the b5. The pentatonic scale will give you that classic blues sound. Next try playing a G dorian scale over the dominant chord. This scale could also be called F major scale starting on G. The dorian scale will defiantly give you a different sound. This dorian sound compliments the minor pentatonic scale nicely. Now let’s get out there a little bit! Try playing a  C harmonic minor over your G7 chord. The little rule on that is you can play the harmonic minor scale up a forth from what ever dominant chord your looking to improvise over.

Well after reading this you should have many different sound options when it’s time to improvise over your dominant 7th chords. Please feel free to contact us and come in for a music lesson to learn all about improvising and anything else pertaining to music from one of our great instructor at the Colorado School of Music in Golden CO. We offer guitar lessons, ukulele lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons, violin lessons and vocal lessons as wells as orchestral instruments.  info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com or 303-526-9865

Thanks for reading!

Dean Cutinelli

guitar lessons

CSoM NEWSLETTER … Back to School 2019

CSoM NEWSLETTER … Back to School 2019

The Colorado School of Music offers piano lessons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, drums lessons, voice lessons and band/orchestra instruments for all ages and levels. Located in the heart of downtown Golden, our current roster is comprised of musicians from all over the Denver Metro area and includes students from Golden, Denver, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Littleton and Boulder! 

Back to School! 

Summer may not be entirely gone, but the kids are almost back in school! Although we’re located in Golden, our students come from all over the Metro Area including Arvada, Lakewood, Wheat Ridge, Littleton–even as far as Boulder and Denver! Our school age students attend no less than 14 different area schools, and range in grade from Kindergarten to Graduate school!

Joining a school band or orchestra this fall? The Colorado School of Music offers private instruction for all band and orchestra instruments including brass instruments, woodwinds, violin lessons and drum lessons!   

Fall Schedules

If you’re a student returning from summer vacation and you’d like to get back into private music lessons for the fall – call soon to reserve your day and time for August and the upcoming school year! Spots are going fast!  Our fall hours will be the same as our summer hours; M-F 2pm-8pm. We currently offer piano lessons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, voice lessons, drum lessons and lessons in all band instruments! 

Need to Move?

Did your soccer coach just re-structure practice times and throw your schedule into chaos? You’re probably not alone.  We understand the rigors of fall scheduling…so if you find that your music lesson time slot doesn’t fit, call us at 303-526-9865 and leave your name, current time slot and any days and times that work for your schedule and we’ll do our best to re-locate you!

Please Leave a Message-

During the course of a week we field many phone calls from students and parents regarding lessons, scheduling and cancellations. During the afternoon, we often let the answering machine retrieve our messages so as not to disrupt class sessions. Please know that we are very conscientious about retrieving our missed calls and we always listen to our messages. We do not, however, make return calls for lesson cancellations unless requested. If you need to cancel for the week, please call 303-526-9865 and leave a message. Thank you!

Scheduled Holiday Closures, 2019

Labor Day- Monday, September 2nd

Thanksgiving Holiday, Thursday and Friday, November 28-29

Holiday Break- Monday, Dec. 23 2019 – Friday Jan. 3, 2020

Keep practicing!

July Music Blog

Performing as a Professional Musician

Dean Cutinelli here from the Colorado School of Music. Remember we are just a call away to start your private music lessons. We offer guitar lessonspiano lessons, drum lessons,Violin lessons, vocal lessons as well as orchestral instruments. Now on to our discussion on performing as a professional musician.

There are many different aspects that go into live performances as a professional musician.

First is knowing the material you will be playing inside and out. The more comfortable you are with the music you are performing, the more you can focus on your stage presence and interacting with the other musicians on the stage. Depending on how much time you’ll have to the learn the material can dictate how you might prepare for different gigs. If you know your going to have a few months and a handful of rehearsals for said gig I would recommend memorizing as much of the material as possible. Making sure any of the parts that you have had trouble with are rehearsed over and over. If you think you have the trouble parts down try playing them with a metronome. Some times counting a part is the best way to get it down. If your working on something technical don’t be afraid to slow it down and slowly work it back up to speed with the metronome. If you have accepted a gig and you are going to have limited time to learn the material I recommend charting out the material. You can get as detailed as you think you need. Make sure you make any specific notes on the charts that will help you perform the material. Make sure you include time signatures and keys signatures. Make sure you’re ready to take a solo if asked. If mistakes happen and they do to the best of us just keep playing and don’t dwell on it. Try not to make a funny face or look around to see if anyone noticed. There is a saying if you make a mistake make it sound and look like you ment it. Stay in the moment!

Now you have the material ready to go you have to consider your gear and anything that needs to have a backup available. If you perform with a string instrument always have replacement strings available. Bring extra cables if your set up requires them. Second you should also have a backup instrument. Yes bring a second guitar or keyboard or what ever your instrument maybe. Drummers make sure you have backup heads and an extra snare drum. If possible I would recommend drummers bring a backup bass drum pedal as well. If you’r using any kind of tube amplifier definitely bring a backup solid state amp. Tube amplifiers can be very finicky. Anything else that you use for your performance and is a necessity bring a backup. Availability is paramount!

Speaking of availability, having reliable transportation is also of the utmost importance. Keeping a can of fix a flat in your car is a good idea along with having a spare tire. Make sure you give yourself a time buffer just in case you get lost or have some kind of car trouble. Also make sure you have extra time to set up your gear. You never know when you might have to trouble shoot your rig.

Last is dress for success. Remember we are entertainers and performers. We should look and sound the part. The more you enjoy yourself on stage the more audience will enjoy the performance and there experience. Ok now let’s go break a leg!

Thank for reading.

music blog

Dean Cutinelli

CSoM NEWSLETTER … July 2019

CSoM NEWSLETTER … July 2019

Happy Summer!

The Colorado School of Music provides private music lessons for all ages and levels in piano lessons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, drums lessons, voice lessons and band/orchestra instruments. Located in the heart of downtown Golden, our current roster is comprised of musicians from all over the Denver Metro area and includes students from Golden, Denver, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Littleton and Boulder! 

Summer Music

The Colorado School of Music is open year-round and we offer our normal schedule of private lessons throughout the warm months. Summer is a great time to begin youth piano lessons or guitar lessons – or perhaps you’re interested in trying something new like ukulele lessons or drums lessons. School band members – get ahead of your orchestra by taking some private instrument lessons during the break! Great slots are still available – email info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com or call us to set up a summer music lesson today!    

Fall Music

If you’re a student returning from summer vacation and you’d like to get back into private music lessons for the fall – call soon to reserve your day and time for August and the upcoming school year! Spots are going fast!  Our fall hours will be the same as our summer hours; M-F 2pm-8pm. We currently offer piano lessons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, voice lessons, drum lessons and lessons in all band instruments! Call 303-526-9865 to get on schedule.

Odd Instrument?  – They’re not really odd, just interesting! The Colorado School of Music has talented instructors who specialize in many instruments. Do you play the trombone or the glockenspiel? Is it difficult finding a djembe teacher? If you play an unconventional instrument and are looking for direction, call 303-526-9865 or send us an email at info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com and let us know what you’re looking for – chances are, we have an instructor that can help you!

Never Too Old…music lessons for adults!

Music lessons are for the young at heart, not just the young. If you’ve been thinking of renewing your love of piano or taking your guitar playing to the next level, try a private lesson with us! At the Colorado School of Music we are proud to have many adult students on our roster, studying all different disciplines. Our instructors are experienced with students of all ages, and will be happy to work with you to be sure that your lessons meet your individual needs. Adult music lessons are available for all instruments, including guitar lessons, piano lessons, singing lessons, drums, violin, and more.

Please Leave a Message-

During the course of a week we field many phone calls from students and parents regarding lessons, scheduling and cancellations. During the afternoon, we often let the answering machine retrieve our messages so as not to disrupt class sessions. Please know that we are very conscientious about retrieving our missed calls and we always listen to our messages. We do not, however, routinely make return calls for lesson cancellations unless requested. If you need to cancel for the week, please call 303-526-9865 and leave a message. Thank you!

Vocal lessons and Piano lessons
Private Music Lessons

Keep practicing, and enjoy the hot weather!

June Music Blog

June Music Blog

Dean Cutinelli here from the Colorado School of Music. Remember we are just a call away to start your private music lessons. We offer guitar lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons,Violin lessons, vocal lessons as well orchestral instruments.

Now on to our discussion of the Phrygian scale. The Phrygain mode is like the other modes I have discussed in my three previous music blogs. If you missed those, a mode in the theory of Western music, is a type of musical scale coupled with a set of characteristic melodic behaviors. Musical modes have been a part of western musical thought since the Middle Ages, and were inspired by the theory of ancient Greek music. The Phrygian mode is the minor scale that appears when a major scale is started from the third note (third scale-degree). Thus, a C major scale played from “E” is an E Phrygian. This is why the term “mode” is more appropriate than “scale”. The E Phrygian mode is the same as a C major starting on E. Your notes for this scale would be E,F,G,A,B,C and D.

The History of Phrygian

The Phrygian mode can refer to three different musical modes: the ancient Greek tonos or harmonia sometimes called Phrygian, formed on a particular set or scales; the Medieval Phrygian mode, and the modern conception of the Phrygian mode as diatonic scale, based on the latter. The Phrygian tonos or harmonia is named after the ancient kingdom of Phrygia in Anatolia. The octave species (scale) underlying the ancient-Greek Phrygian tonos corresponds to the medieval and modern Dorian Mode. The early Catholic Church developed a system of eight musical modes that medieval music scholars gave names drawn from the ones used to describe the ancient Greek harmoniai. The name “Phrygian” was applied to the third of these eight church modes the authentic mode on E, described as the diatonic octave extending from E to the E an octave higher and divided at B, therefore beginning with a semitone-tone-tone-tone pentachord followed by a semitone-tone-tone tetrachord. Finally In modern western music, the Phrygian mode is related to the modern , also known as the Aeolian mode, but with the second scale degree lowered by a semitone, making it a minor second above the tonic, rather than a major second.

Who uses the Phrygian Mode

Phrygian in sound is considered a minor sound or Scale. Another way to theorize the Phrygian mode is A minor scale with a flatted second. Giving this mode a minor Sound. In modern classical music you can here is mode used in “I Hear an Army”, from Three Songs, op. 10. In a more modern setting you here this sound in Howard Shore, “Prologue” accompanying the opening sequence of the film Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. In a jazz context you can here this sound in “Solea” by Gil Evans from Sketches of Spain.

I hope after reading this you have a better Idea on what a mode is and in particular the Phrygian mode. Please feel free to contact us and come in for a music lesson to learn all about the modes and anything else pertaining to music from one of our great instructor at the Colorado School of Music in Golden CO. We offer guitar lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons, violin lessons and vocal lessons as wells as orchestral instruments. 

Thanks for reading!

Dean Cutinelli

Dean Cutinelli - Guitar, Bass Guitar, Ukulele & Mandolin
Colorado School of Music

CSoM NEWSLETTER … June 2019

CSoM NEWSLETTER …  June 2019

The Colorado School of Music provides private music lessons for all ages and levels in piano lesssons, guitar lessons, violin lessons, drums lessons, voice lessons and band/orchestra instruments. Located in the heart of downtown Golden, our current roster is comprised of musicians from all over the Denver Metro area and includes students from Golden, Denver, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Littleton and Boulder! 

Colorado School of Music 2019 Recital

Congratulations to all of our performers and thank you to our audience for making this year’s recital a big success! We had over 70 participants performing this year!  Special thanks to the Arvada Center and Schmitt Music in Denver, who provided our grand piano. See you same time next year!

Summer Music Lessons

The Colorado School of Music is open year-round and we offer our normal schedule of private lessons throughout the warm months. Summer is a great time to begin youth piano lessons or guitar lessons – or perhaps you’re interested in trying something new like ukulele lessons or drums. School band members – get ahead of your section by taking some private instrument lessons during the break! Great slots are still available – email info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com or call us at 303-526-9865 to set up a summer music lesson today!    

Too Young For Music?

We often receive questions from parents regarding the appropriate/best age to start young children in formal music lessons. Of course, all children are different and there are always exceptions, but here are the general guidelines we use:

First, consider the instrument in relation to the age of the student. Piano lessons and Violin lessons are great choices for young children, as both violin and piano lessons have excellent curriculum for young beginners. Piano, in particular, provides a general overview of music theory and makes it easy to pick up other instruments as the student gets older. Some instruments can be difficult for beginners and aren’t as good for young children based on size, complexity, etc..       

Four years old is generally too young for formal music lessons. Progress is very slow and it can be difficult to maintain the focus required for practicing. Four year old hands are also often still too small for pianos.

We feel that six years old is generally the best age for young children to begin formal lessons. Many lesson books and methods are geared toward this age for beginners, and the progress made at this age is both faster than younger students and better learned, as lessons and concepts seem to ‘stick.’

Five year olds music students are in the middle – at this age, it seems to depend on the child. If motivated and interested, the progress with a five year old will be a bit slower, but nonetheless valuable. We’re always willing to try lessons with five year olds – please ask if you have more questions about beginners or you’d like to take an introductory lesson with your young musician. As always, Parents are welcome in all lessons!  

Never Too Old…music lessons for adults!

Music lessons are for the young at heart, not just the young. If you’ve been thinking of renewing your love of piano or taking your guitar playing to the next level, try a private lesson with us! At the Colorado School of Music we are proud to have many adult students on our roster, studying all different disciplines. Our instructors are experienced with students of all ages, and will be happy to work with you to be sure that your lessons meet your individual needs. 

Adult music lessons are available for all instruments, including guitar lessons, piano lessons, singing lessons, drums lessons, violin lessons, and more. To try an introductory lesson, just call 303-526-9865 or email info@coloradoschoolofmusic.com

Happy Summer! See you next month!

Piano Lessons
Piano Lessons

May Music Blog

May Music Blog

Dean Cutinelli here from the Colorado School of Music. Remember we are just a call away to start your private music lessons. We offer guitar lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons,Violin lessons, vocal lessons as well orchestral instruments. Now on to our discussion of the Lydian scale.

The Lydian Scale

The Lydian scale or mode as it is more commonly referred to is the 4th mode of the seven modes that are derived from ancient greek music. If you were to play a  C major scale starting on the 4th scale degree you would be playing F Lydian. The notes for the scale would be F, G, A, B, C, D, and E. Yes this can be theorized by say this is just a C major scale starting on F.  When you put an F major chord behind the C major scale you now create the model sound of F Lydian. In this example if we think of F as our key center we could also say we are playing and F major scale with a raised or sharp fourth in it. Our notes would be F, G, A, B,C,D and E. Remembering that our key signature for F major is Bb, there for we now have B natural or a major scale with a sharp 4th. You now have again the Lydian scale. This scale is a perfect fit when you see a Major 7th chord with a sharp 4th. Vamp on a F major chord followed by  F Major 7th #4 or try F to G13.  Both progressions will give you A chance to test out your F Lydian scale.

The History of Lydian 

The name Lydian refers to the ancient kingdom of Lydia in Anatolia. In Greek music theory, there was a Lydian scale or “octave species” extending from parhypate hypaton to trite diezeugmenon, equivalent in the diatonic genus to the medieval and modern Ionian mode. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, this mode was described in two ways. The first way is the diatonic octave species from F up to F an octave above, divided at C to produce two segments. The second is as a mode with a final on F and an ambitus extending to F an octave higher and in which the note C was regarded as having an important melodic function. 

Who uses the Lydian Mode

The Lydian mode is defiantly a particular sound. You don’t hear it used as wide as you would the Mixolydian mode, but it still has its place. An example from the middle of the century is the scherzo movement of Carlos Chávez‘s Symphony No. 3. In the jazz world the Lydian mode inspired the works of people such as Miles Davis and John Coltrane. In popular music the passage beginning at the words “Much as I definitely enjoy solitude” in the song “Possibly Maybe” by Björk shows of the sound of the Lydian scale.The bass line in The Police‘s 1983 song “Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic” again incorporates the Lydian sound. Many Polish folksongs, including the mazurka, are in the Lydian mode; the first six notes of this mode were sometimes known as the “Polish mode”.

I hope after reading this you have a better Idea on what a mode is and in particular the Lydian mode. Please feel free to contact us and come in for a music lesson to learn all about the modes and anything else pertaining to music from one of our great instructor at the Colorado School of Music in Golden CO. We offer guitar lessons, piano lessons, drum lessons, violin lessons and vocal lessons as wells as orchestral instruments. 

Thanks for reading!

music blog

Dean Cutinelli